Configuring OpenID (SSO) based authentication

How to set up OpenID based authentication for your Anka Build Cloud Controller & Registry

This guide and feature require an Anka Enterprise Plus license.

Before you begin, you will need to setup Certificate Authentication. This allows your Anka Nodes to join (and attach your Enterprise Plus license) to the Controller properly, since ANKA_ENABLE_AUTH will be turned on.

You must have at least one node with a Enterprise or higher license joined to the Controller for these features to work.

Many organizations and developers are already familiar with OpenID Connect (OIDC). OIDC is a layer that sits on top of OAuth 2.0 and performs the authorization necessary to access protected resources, such as the Anka Build Cloud Controller.

When using OIDC, you'll need an Authorization Server. In this guide, we will use Keycloak as our Authorization Server as it's fairly easy to run and setup. It will contain the realm, client ID, user, group, and anything else we will need for logging into the Anka Build Cloud Controller.

This guide will be running the Anka Build Cloud and Keycloak on the same machine. It is meant to give you an idea of how to configure and is not recommended for production.

We will then log into the Anka Build Cloud Controller UI and use the /admin/ui#/controllerGroups page to create limited permissions for your groups.

Setup Keycloak in Docker

Run the docker container

docker run --rm -p 8080:8080 -e KEYCLOAK_USER=admin -e KEYCLOAK_PASSWORD=admin quay.io/keycloak/keycloak:latest

Configure your Keycloak

  1. Follow the instructions in https://www.keycloak.org/getting-started/getting-started-docker to set up your Keycloak:
  • I used myrealm as the Realm name.
  • I created user nathan with the password of nathan (turn off Temporary). I filled in my full name too.
  • When creating the Client, I set anka as the Client ID, clicked Save, then entered https://anka.controller:8090 (this is the URL for the controller I run) for the Valid Redirect URIs. I also set Access Type to confidential and enabled Implicit Flow.
  1. Next, create the groups Client Scope. Then, under Clients > anka > Client Scopes, add the groups Client Scope (select it and then click Add Selected). Then, back under the groups Client Scope, click Add Builtin, and choose groups, then Add Selected.

  2. You can now create a group called anka-controller-access and then join it to the user you created.

At this point, you'll have Keycloak ready to use with your Anka Build Cloud Controller. Though, we need first to enable it.

Enable OpenID in your Controller configuration

In order to enable OpenID, you'll need to modify your docker-compose.yml (if you're using our docker package) or the /usr/local/bin/anka-controllerd (if you're using the native Mac package).

You can find a list of configuration options in the Configuration Reference by searching for ANKA_OIDC

Here is what your docker-compose.yml should look like for use with Keycloak:

  anka-controller:
    container_name: anka-controller
    build:
       context: .
       dockerfile: anka-controller.docker
    ports:
       - "8090:80"
    volumes:
       - /Users/myUserName:/mnt/cert
    depends_on:
       - etcd
       - anka-registry
    restart: always
    environment:
      ANKA_REGISTRY_ADDR: "https://anka.registry:8089"
      ANKA_USE_HTTPS: "true"
      ANKA_SKIP_TLS_VERIFICATION: "false"
      ANKA_SERVER_CERT: "/mnt/cert/anka-controller-crt.pem"
      ANKA_SERVER_KEY: "/mnt/cert/anka-controller-key.pem"
      ANKA_CA_CERT: "/mnt/cert/anka-ca-crt.pem"
      ANKA_ENABLE_AUTH: "true"
      ANKA_ROOT_TOKEN: "1111111111"
      ANKA_OIDC_DISPLAY_NAME="Keycloak"
      ANKA_OIDC_PROVIDER_URL="http://host.docker.internal:8080/auth/realms/myrealm"
      ANKA_OIDC_CLIENT_ID="anka"

  anka-registry:
    container_name: anka-registry
    build:
        context: .
        dockerfile: anka-registry.docker
    ports:
        - "8091:8089"
    restart: always
    volumes:
      - "/Library/Application Support/Veertu/Anka/registry:/mnt/vol"
      - /Users/myUser/:/mnt/cert
    environment:
      ANKA_USE_HTTPS: "true"
      ANKA_SKIP_TLS_VERIFICATION: "false"
      ANKA_SERVER_CERT: "/mnt/cert/anka-controller-crt.pem"
      ANKA_SERVER_KEY: "/mnt/cert/anka-controller-key.pem"
      ANKA_CA_CERT: "/mnt/cert/anka-ca-crt.pem"
      ANKA_ENABLE_AUTH: "true"

After that, just docker-compose down -t 50 && docker-compose up -d and try accessing the Controller at its HTTPS URL or IP. If you did everything correctly (you enabled certificate authentication and joined your node right?), you should see a Log In box with two options: Login with Keycloak and Login with superuser

OpenID Login Buttons

We first want to log in with superuser (the ANKA_ROOT_TOKEN defined above in the config).

Once logged in, you will see Admin on the left navigation

Admin Navigation

Under the Admin page, we want to add a New Group. The Group Name will be the name of the group you created within Keycloak.

Managing User/Group Permissions

This feature requires Enterprise Plus

Permission groups are configurable from your Controller's https://<controller address>/admin/ui page.

The permission groups here differ from the groups you assign to nodes within the Controller UI

When creating certificates, you'll want to specify CSR values using openssl's -subj option. For example, if we're going to generate a certificate so our Jenkins instance can access the Controller & Registry, you'll want to use something like this:

-subj "/O=MyOrgName/OU=$ORG_UNIT/CN=Jenkins"

Required values are O= and CN=

Spaces are supported in O= and Anka Build Cloud Controller version >= 1.10

Within the Controller, we use O= as the permission group name and CN= as the username. The Group Name will be MyOrgName, like we used in the -subj above.

The Available Permissions list will display all of the permissions we can assign to the group (see below for the full list). These permissions will allow plugins/users (like Jenkins) to communicate with the Controller & Registry:

  • get_groups
  • get_registry_disk_info
  • head_push_vms
  • list_images
  • list_nodes
  • list_vms
  • pull_vm
  • push_vm
  • registry_list
  • save_image
  • start_vm
  • terminate_vm
  • update_vm
  • upload_file
  • view_logs

Controller Permissions

PermissionDescription
Instances
list_vmsgives the user permission to list vms
start_vmgives the user permission to start vm
terminate_vmgives the user permission to terminate vm
Registry
get_registry_filesgives the user permission to get registry files (logs)
view_logsgives the user permission to view log files in dashboard
get_registry_disk_infogives the user permission to get registry disk info
registry_listgives the user permission to list vms on registry
registry_deletegives the user permission to registry delete
Nodes
list_nodesgives the user permission to list nodes
delete_nodegives the user permission to delete node
change_node_configgives the user permission to change node configuration
Node Groups
create_groupgives the user permission to create node groups
get_groupsgives the user permission to view node groups
delete_groupgives the user permission to delete node groups
update_groupgives the user permission to update node groups
add_node_to_groupgives the user permission to add a node to a node group
remove_group_from_nodegives the user permission to remove a node from node group
Distribute VMs
registry_distributegives the user permission to distribute vms from registry
registry_distribute_statusgives the user permission to view distribution statuses
Config
change_configgives the user permission to change global configuration
get_configgives the user permission to view global configuration
Permissions and groups
view_permissionsgives the user permission to view the list of available permissions
view_prmission_groupsgives the user permission to view permission groups
update_permission_groupsgives the user permission to update permission groups
delete_permission_groupsgives the user permission to delete permission groups

Registry Permissions

PermissionDescription
Information about Registry
indexgives the user permission to view the registry index (welcome html file)
get_disk_infogives the user permission to get disk info
List VMs
list_vmsgives the user permission to list vms
Push VMs
head_push_vmgives the user permission to “negotiate” a push (understand which files exists on the server and which files need to be sent)
push_vmgives the user permission to push vm and create new vms or tags
Pull VMs
pull_vmgives the user permission to get a pull vm request (list of files needed for download and their paths)
download_vmgives the user permission to download vm files (as given by pull_vm)
Delete VMs
delete_vmgives the user permission to delete a vm
revertgives the user permission to revert vm versions
File Server
upload_filegives the user permission to upload a file
download_filegives the user permission to download a file
Log Server
get_streamergives the user permission to get an html streamer page (for logs)
stream_loggives the user permission to stream a log file (as given by get_streamer)
get_log_archivegives the user permission to download a log archive (tar.gz)
send_log_eventgives the user permission to send log events (only applies specifically to eventLog)
send_loggives the user permission to send a log file row
Permissions and groups
view_permissionsgives the user permission to view the list of available permissions
view_prmission_groupsgives the user permission to view permission groups
update_permission_groupsgives the user permission to update permission groups
delete_permission_groupsgives the user permission to delete permission groups

Once you've added all of the proper permissions, you can now go back to the main Controller page and log out of the superuser. You can now choose Login with Keycloak, which will redirect you to your Keycloak to have you log in with the user you created earlier in this guide. You will then be taken to the Controller UI and be logged in as that user.


Last modified September 21, 2020 : 8089 (fb1ca98) by Nathan Pierce